Sesame Asparagus with Soba & Tofu

This is a riff on a favorite Korean Spinach Salad.  Quick, nutritious, delicious and filling.

Cut 12 oz. tofu into thick matchsticks.  Drizzle with 1 t. sesame oil and 1 T. soy sauce.  Let sit for 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, soak and drain 4 C. spinach leaves until the water is clean.  Drain and spin dry.

Finely slice 1 stem of Green garlic, leaves and stems.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.  Snap 1 bunch of asparagus spears, then drop into the water.  When it returns to a boil, turn it off.  Check the asparagus; they should be tender but crisp.  If not, let them sit another minute or two. Remove the asparagus and rinse briefly — they should still be warm.  Cut into 1 inch pieces.

You can use the same water to cook 8 oz. soba noodles, or start with a fresh batch.  Follow the directions on the package — it usually involves adding cold water during the cooking process.

Toss the asparagus and spinach with the garlic to combine.  The spinach should wilt.

Make a sauce of  1 T. soy sauce, 1 T . sesame oil, and 1 t. rice vinegar. (Add hot chili oil to taste if you like).  Mix with the spinach and asparagus.  Add the tofu.

Toss the vegetables with the soba noodles.

Toast 2 T. sesame seeds in a pan and sprinkle over the top.

CLICK HERE FOR MEMBER NEWS

A Shout-Out to the Production Crew

On our farm, “the harvest” is a daily, never-ending activity that involves the majority of our team’s time and energy. Picking the crops, washing them, sorting them and packing them is a year-round activity. Anyone who calls this “unskilled labor”, … Continue reading

The Revenge of the Fungi

The use of antibiotics in conventional livestock production has made meat cheap and abundant, but it has also contributed to the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacterias like E. Coli and Salmonella. Now, a new drug-resistant pathogen is spreading rapidly through hospitals … Continue reading

Foraging in our own Fields

During the fall, spring, and winter I enjoy foraging for wild mushrooms in our fields as well as the surrounding woods. We don’t get many of the exciting varieties that Bay Area mushroom hunters treasure, like chanterelles or morels. But … Continue reading