Spinach and Pea Curry

Most Indian “Saag” or spinach dishes boil the spinach until very soft before sauteing, and some even puree it.  In this recipe, the spinach is just wilted using boiling water, which leaves it with a little more texture.  If you like your Saag super-soft, you will want to boil the spinach for a minute or two and then drain it.  You can also add paneer or soft tofu if you want a more filling dish.

Soak 1/2 lb. spinach leaves and then drain.  Repeat until the drained water is clean.  Place the spinach in a colander.

Boil water in a pot or kettle.  Slowly drizzle the boiling water over the spinach, using a tongs to make sure it all gets wilted.  Rinse with cold water to cool, then allow to drain and squeeze out the excess water.  Chop the spinach roughly.

Shell 1 lb. of English Peas.

Peel 1 Large or 2 medium onions and chop finely.  Saute in 2 T. ghee or coconut oil with 2 t. each fresh minced ginger and garlic, a pinch of nutmeg, and hot green chilis to taste.  When the onions are soft, add 1/2 t. turmeric and garam masala powders, 1 T. cumin powder, and 1 t. coriander powder.  Stir to combine, then add the spinach and peas and cook until the peas are tender.

Season with salt and lemon or lime juice.  Serve with rice.

 

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