Grilled Zucchini with Green Bean-Tomato Salad

Different flavors, textures and cooking techniques combine in this perfect end-of-summer dish

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.  While the water is heating, trim 1/2 lb. whole green beans.  

Toast 1/2 C. pumpkin seeds in the toaster oven.

Dice tomatoes to make 1 1/2 C.  Place in a bowl with their juices and toss with 1/2 t. salt plus pepper.  

Peel 1 small clove of garlic then press and add to the tomatoes.

When the pot returns to a boil, transfer the beans to a cold water bath then rinse and drain when cool.  Toss the green beans with the tomatoes and 3 T. olive oil.

Trim the ends of 1 lb. of zucchini.  Use a mandoline, vegetable peeler or sharp knife to thinly slice the zucchini across it’s entire width.  Lay them on a platter or large plate.

Mix together 1 T. olive oil, 1 t. sesame oil and 2 T. soy sauce plus black pepper.  Pour onto a plate, then pour it over the zucchini slices and let them sit for 10 minutes.

Heat the grill to high and use a tongs to place the zucchini slices on the grate in a single layer.  Turn them as they brown — the first side takes longer to cook.  Remove each slice to a different plate.  Cook in batches until they are finished.

Serve the green bean/tomato salad topped with a heap of squash slices and sprinkle with the toasted pumpkin seeds.

 

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