Gnocchi with Asparagus and Green Garlic

Don’t worry, this isn’t a recipe for making gnocchi — just one for making cooking store-bought gnocchi with fresh spring vegetables.  Green Garlic is the star of this recipe so don’t skimp on it.

Heat the oven to 400.

Soak 1 bunch of asparagus and snap off the tough ends.  Cut into 1 inch pieces; slicing any spears thicker than a Sharpie marker in half lengthwise. Arrange in a single layer on a cookie sheet, then drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with 2 T. chopped green garlic.  Sprinkle with salt and pepper.  Roast until lightly browned, then turn the spears and continue roasting until they are tender.

Soak 2 C. of spinach leaves and drain, multiple times if necessary until the water is clean.

Bring a pot of salted water to a boil and then drop 1 lb. gnocchi in the water.  When the gnocchi float to the surface, scoop them out and rinse them off.

Meanwhile, melt 2 T. butter in a large skillet and add 1 stalk of chopped green garlic, white and green parts .  When the garlic is tender, add 2 C. vegetable stock and the gnocchi.  Cook for 3 minute, until the sauce has thickened slightly.  Add 2 C. spinach leaves, 2 T. lemon juice, 1/2 C. finely grated parmesan cheese, and salt and pepper to taste.

Serve the gnocchi in bowls in a shallow pool of broth and top with the asparagus and more parmesan.

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