Glass Noodle Veggie Stir Fry (Japchae)

Vegetables are not just a great substitute for noodles, but also a great pair with them.  In this recipe the beets and/or carrots are spiralized and then sauteed with glass noodles, which are made from mung beans or sweet potatoes and are thus also gluten and grain-free.

Soak 6 oz. of glass noodles in warm water for 2 hours or overnight.  Drain and rinse.

Soak 1 C. dried shitake mushrooms in warm water for half an hour.  Remove the mushrooms and save the water.

Marinate the mushrooms in 2 t. soy sauce, 1 t. rice wine, 1 t. minced garlic, 1/2 t. sesame oil and black pepper.

Scrub 1 beet and 2 carrots (You can also use just beets or just carrots; double the amounts) Use a spiralizer to turn the vegetables into noodles the same size as the glass noodles.

Thinly slice 1 onion.

Make the sauce: 3 T. soy sauce, 1 T. sugar, 1 T. rice wine, 1 T. sesame oil and 1 T. sesame seeds.

Heat 2 T. peanut oil in a wok and add the onions.  Stir fry until tender, then add the shitakes and their marinade to the pan and stir fry another 2 minutes.  Add the carrots and beets and saute 1-2 minutes.

Add the glass noodles and the shitake soaking water.  Stir fry another 1 minute, then add the sauce.  Cook another 1-2 minutes, until the sauce is absorbed.

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