Drunken “Noodles”

This Thai dish is traditonally made with wide rice noodles.  This version substitutes very thinly sliced or spiralized summer squash, which has a similar texture and absorbs the flavors just as well. This recipe is often made with chicken or tofu but the version below is all vegetables.

Trim the ends off 1 lb. summer squash.  Use a sharp knife or a mandolin to thinly slice zucchini lenthwise, then cut in halves or thirds lengthwise like fat noodles.  For pattypan squash, use a spiralizer to turn them into noodles.  Place the squash noodles in a colander and toss with 1/2 T. salt.  The squash will release a large amount of water.

Remove the husks from 2 ears of corn.  Carefully cut the kernels off the cobs.

Thinly slice 1-2 onion to make 2 C.

Mince 3 cloves of garlic.  Mince fresh ginger to make 1 T.

Remove the leaves from 1 bunch of basil.

In a small bowl, mix together 3 T. soy sauce, 1 T. fish sauce, 1 T. oyster sauce, and a large pinch of ground white pepper.

Squeeze the squash noodles to get any remaining water out; you can also spin them in a salad spinner.

Stir fry the onions in 3 T. safflower or peanut oil on medium heat until they soften, then add the ginger, garlic and basil for a minute.  Toss in the corn kernels and stir fry for another minute.

Turn up the heat to high and add the squash noodles and sauce.  Stir fry until the squash is tender but not mushy.

 

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