Coconut Milk French Toast with Strawberries

For me, French Toast is just a vehicle to eat lots of strawberries.  This isn’t a vegan recipe, but it is dairy-free.  You can easily use cow milk instead of coconut. There are some important details in this recipe that I have put in italics.

Cut the tops off 1 basket of strawberries, then slice the berries.  Drizzle them with 1 t. maple syrup, toss to combine, then let sit at room temperature to warm up.  Warm berries are much more flavorful than cold ones.

In a large, shallow bowl or other container, whisk together 1 C. unsweetened coconut milk beverage (NOT coconut cream or canned Thai-style coconut milk for cooking), 2 eggs, a pinch of nutmeg, 1/2 t. ginger powder, a pinch of salt, and 1 t. sugar.

Cut 4-6 thick slices off a loaf of crusty bread.  You don’t want a fluffy, airy loaf but nothing too dense either.  It has to be able to soak up the custard and hold onto it.

Soak the bread in the custard for at least 5 minutes on each side.  If the bread doesn’t soak up most of the custard, it needs to sit longer.

Heat 1 T. coconut oil in a heavy bottomed pan for at least five minutes on medium low heat.  To get a good sear on the toast, you need to make sure the entire pan is hot and not just the oil.

Raise the heat to medium high for a minute, then drop the individual slices onto the pan, keeping them separate.  Spoon any leftover batter over them, pressing down so it soaks into the top of the bread.

When the bottoms are nicely browned, carefully flip the toast over and cook another 3-5 minutes until the other side is browned.

Serve immediately with the warm berries and your choice of other toppings.

 

 

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