Butternut Waffles, Two Ways

Butternut squash adds natural sweetness, moisture, flavor and nutrition to waffles without affecting the crispy texture that makes them so special.  Here’s a sweet version for breakfast and a savory version for lunch or dinner.

Both recipes start by roasting half a butternut in the oven at 400 degrees until soft and caramelized around the edge.  Once the squash has cooled, remove and discard the pulp and seeds from the seed cavity and the skin.  You can cook the squash in advance and store in the fridge for several days in a sealed container.

Sweet Butternut Waffles

Grease a waffle iron and heat it up.

Separate the yolks from the whites of 2 eggs.  Combine the egg yolks only with 1 1/2 C. mashed squash, 2 C. milk, 1/2 C. butter, 1 T. maple syrup and 1 t. vanilla extract.  Mix together well.

In a separate bowl, combine 2 C. whole wheat pastry flour, 1 T. baking powder, 1/2 t. salt, plus 1/4 t. each ground nutmeg, ground ginger, and ground cinnamon.  Whisk together well with a fork.

Stir together the dry and liquid ingredients with as few motions as possible.

Beat the egg whites until they are fluffy but not stiff.  Stir into the batter.

Pour the batter onto the waffle iron with a ladle.  Cook each waffle until crisp.

Savory Butternut-Leek Waffles

Clean and dice 1 Leek to make 1 C.  Saute the leeks in 2 T. butter or olive oil on medium heat until soft, about 10 minutes.

Grease a waffle iron and heat it up.

Separate the yolks from the whites of 2 eggs.

Combine egg yolks only with 2 C. milk, 4 T. melted butter, and 1 1/2 C. mashed butternut squash.

In a separate bowl, combine 2 C. whole wheat pastry flour with 1 T. baking powder plus 1/2 t. each salt and pepper.

Add the wet and dry ingredients together and quickly stir to combine.

Whisk the egg whites in along with 3 oz. grated cheddar or gruyere cheese and the sauteed leeks.

Pour the batter onto the waffle iron with a ladle and cook until crisp.  Keep warm in the oven until serving.

 

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