Chard & Mushroom Shepherd’s Pie

We don’t grow mushrooms at Terra Firma, but mushroom hunters know this is the best time of year to find them growing wild in Northern California and they are abundant at markets as well.  They pair beautifully with chard.  This recipe can easily be halved and baked in a smaller dish.

Preheat the oven to 350.

Boil 2 lbs. of potatoes in salted water until quite tender.  Drain, then mash with 4 T. butter or olive oil and 1/3 C. of milk or your favorite milk alternative (unsweetened).  Season generously with salt and pepper.

While the potatoes are cooking, clean and slice 2 leeks.  Saute in 2 T. olive oil over low heat until they are completely soft.

Trim and rinse 2 C. mushrooms, ideally a combination of varieties.  Slice them and then add to the leeks along with 1/2 t. dried thyme and salt and pepper to taste.  When the mushrooms have released their juices, add 1 C.white wine and stir to combine.  Mix 1 T. cornstarch with 1 T. water, stir to combine, and add to the pan.  Simmer until the mixture thickens a bit, then transfer the contents of the pan into a 9×13″ baking dish or a large cast iron skillet.

Wash 1 bunch of Chard, separating the stems.  Dice the stems and chop the greens.  Mince 1 clove of garlic and add to the saute pan with 1 T. olive oil and the chard stems.  Cook for 3-4 minutes on medium heat, then add the greens and raise the heat to high.  Stir the chard until it is all wilted.  Transfer to the baking dish, making a layer atop the mushrooom/leek mixture.

Finally, cover the entire dish with a layer of mashed potatoes.  If you want the pie extra crunchy, add a thin layer of breadcrumbs or panko.

Bake for 45 minutes, until the pie is bubbling and crispy on top.

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