Solstice Soup

The first step in this recipe is to make a big pan of roasted veggies.  The challenge is not eating most of them before you make the soup.

Heat the oven to 375.  Scrub and then chop 2 lbs. of potatoes, 1 lb. of carrots, and 1 lb. of Beets.  If you want a very smooth texture, peel the potatoes first.

Place all the vegetables in a large baking dish and drizzle generously with olive oil.  Sprinkle with salt, pepper and 1/2 t. dried thyme.  Roast until the vegetables are all very tender and caramelized, 30-40 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Trim the thin, leafy branches off 1 head of celery and reserve.  Tear off 6 celery stems and wash carefully, then dice them. Peel and dice  1 onion.  Saute the diced celery and onion in a heavy soup pot in 1 T. olive oil until very tender and just beginning to brown.  Season generously with salt and pepper.  Add 1 or more minced clove of garlic and cook another 2 minutes, then add 4 C. broth of your choice.  Add 3 of the reserved celery branches and 1 Bay Leaf and bring to a boil, then lower to a simmer.

When the vegetables in the oven are done roasting, transfer them to a bowl.  Use a ladle to spoon 1/2 C. of the simmering broth (or 1/2 C. white wine) to the roasting pan, then use a wooden spoon to deglaze the pan.  Add the deglazing liquid back to the pot.  Remove the celery and bay leaves.

Puree the soup in batches in a food processor or with a hand blender.  Add 1 1/2 C. milk of your preference to the pot and bring back to a simmer.

Season with lemon juice, salt and pepper to taste.

 

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