Roasted Broccoli and Spinach Sesame Noodles

Roasted Broccoli is something you can prepare ahead of time, then pull out of the fridge and add to salads, pasta, pizza, sandwiches — hot or cold.  This recipe uses Sambal Olek — a prepared chili paste that is quite spicy.  You can substitute a milder product like Black Bean and Garlic paste, or just add some lemon juice and lots of black pepper.

Preheat the oven to 425.

Cut the stalks off 2-3 heads of broccoli.  Peel the stems with a paring knife, then slice the stalks into long, thin pieces.  Separate the florets and cut large ones in halves or quarters.

Toss the broccoli on a baking sheet with 3 T. olive or safflower oil.  Sprinkle with salt and Roast for 15 minutes,

While it is roasting, mince 2 cloves of garlic.

Soak and rinse 4 C. spinach leaves and spin dry.

Remove the cookie sheet.  Toss the broccoli with the garlic, 1 t. sambal olek, and the juice of 1/2 a lemon.  Return to the oven and continue to cook for 10-15 minutes.  The broccoli should be crispy, nicely browned and tender.

Put the spinach in a large bowl and transfer the broccoli into it.  Deglaze the pan with another 1/2 lemon worth of juice and add to the bowl. (Alternately you can throw the spinach onto the hot pan of broccoli right when it comes out of the oven, and use the spinach liquid to deglaze the pan).

Cook 12 oz. udon or ramen noodles according to the directions. Drain and rinse.

Make a dressing with 1/3 C. olive oil, 1/2 C. rice vinegar, 1 T. soy sauce, 1 t. sesame oil, and 1 T. minced and peeled fresh ginger. Season with salt and pepper.

Toss the noodles with the vegetables and add dressing to taste.  Garnish with fresh cilantro and toasted sesame seeds.

 

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