Best Ever Gazpacho

Whether or not you love Gazpacho, you should try this recipe.  The texture is slightly creamy but there are no chunks of vegetables:  you can drink it from a glass.  It uses a large quantity of olive oil, no bread, and a long puree time to emulsify the vegetables.  It’s also dead easy and fast to make, although it is best to let it cool for several hours before serving.  I would not recommend using a food processor for this recipe.

Core 2 lbs. of tomatoes, cut into chunks, and throw into a blender or Vitamix.  Sprinkle liberally with salt and allow to sit for a few minutes.

Meanwhile, cut 1 entire cucumber into chunks.  Dice 1 small onion or 1/2 a medium one.  Mince 1 clove of garlic.  Add them all to the blender.

Put the cover on the blender and start to puree at low speed, gradually working up to medium high.  Puree the vegetables for two full minutes — this will seem like forever but it is necessary to liquify them completely.

Remove the center of the lid and drizzle in 2 t. sherry or red wine vinegar while the blender remains on medium high.  Continue blending while you add 1/2 C. of good quality olive oil in a steady drizzle.

Put the cover back in place and turn the blender up all the way.  Blend for another full 30 seconds.  The gazpacho will turn pinkish-orange as the olive oil emulsifies with the vegetable juice.

Taste and add more salt or vinegar to taste, then puree to combine again.

Refrigerate for at least an hour or preferably 6 hours.  Add pepper to taste when serving.

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