Pea Risotto with Grilled Asparagus & Spring Onions

If it’s not grilling season yet where you live, you can either broil the vegetables in the oven or simply cook them in the risotto.  Either way, though, you should use leek or regular onion as the base for the risotto and add the spring onions much later.

Trim 2 C. Snap peas and cut into half-inch pieces.  Or use 1 C. snap peas and 1 C. shelled English peas.

Snap or trim 1 lb. of Asparagus.  Trim 3-4 spring onions and slice them in half lengthwise.  Marinate the vegetables in 1 T. olive oil  and 2 T. soy sauce whisked together.  Sprinkle with black pepper.

Heat 4 1/2 C. vegetable or mushroom stock in a small pot.  Keep at a gentle simmer.

Clean and dice leek or dry onion to make 1 C.  Saute in a heavy-bottomed pan in 2 T. olive oil with salt and pepper.

When the onion begins to brown, add 2 C. arborio rice and stir to coat with the oil and onions.  Add 1/2 C. dry white wine and stir until it is absorbed.  Begin adding broth to the rice, 1/2 C. at a time, stirring.  You need to keep the heat high enough that the liquid boils gently without burning the rice.

You will add the peas to the risotto along with the final 1/2 C. of broth.  But first, make sure the rice is almost tender.  If not, you will need to heat a little more broth and add it first.  Stir the peas in and cook another 2 minutes.  Turn off the heat, add 1/2 C. finely grated Parmesan cheese and stir it in.  Season with salt and pepper.

Heat the grill or broiler in your oven.  Grill the asparagus and onions until they are light browned on both sides, turning once.  Don’t let the asparagus get limp.  Let them cook a minute or two, then transfer to a cutting board and chop them into 2 inch pieces.

Serve the risotto on plate or in large bowls topped with the vegetables.

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