Asparagus-Spinach-Mushroom Crepes

This is a quick and easy saute that goes into a crepe along with ricotta cheese.  Alternatively, you can make quesadillas and use jack cheese instead, or an omelette and use cheddar.  You can make the filling in advance.

To make crepes:

Melt 1 T. butter.  Whisk 2 eggs in a bowl, then add 1 C. whole milk and 1/4 C. water and whisk together.  Add 1 C. flour a little at a time until you have a thin, smooth batter.  Add a pinch of salt and whisk in the melted butter.

Pour 1/4 C. at a time of batter onto a greased, hot skillet and cook until lightly browned. Flip and cook another minute.  Repeat.  Keep the crepes warm in the oven at 200 degrees.

For the Filling:

Snap off the tough bases on 1 bunch of asparagus.  Cut into 1″ pieces on an angle.

Soak and drain 4 C. spinach leaves until water is clean.  Spin dry.

Trim and thinly slice 1 C. of portabello or crimini mushrooms.

Mince the leaves only of 1 stem of green garlic.

Heat 2 T. olive oil in a large skillet and add the mushrooms and cook on medium heat.  When they soften and release their juices, add the asparagus.  Raise the heat to high and cook until the asparagus is tender.  Season with salt and pepper, then add the spinach and cook until it wilts completely.

Spoon ricotta cheese into each crepe and then a helping of the vegetables.  Fold over and serve.

 

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