Spicy Roasted Beet-Green Bean Tacos with Tangy Slaw

Roasting Beets and Green Beans makes them the perfect filling for vegetarian tacos: cripy, meaty and tender.

Cut the tops off 1 bunch of beets.  Scrub the roots and rinse the tops well.

Cut the beet roots into thick slices, then chop them into small dice.

Trim 1/2 lb. green beans and then chop into small pieces.

Trim 1 leek then cut in half lengthwise and rinse well.  Slice the leek lengthwise and cut the slices into small pieces.

Toss the beets, leeks and beans with 2 T. olive oil plus salt, pepper, 1/4 t. cayenne pepper, 1 t. cumin powder and 1/2 t. coriander powder.  Arrange in a single layer on a baking sheet or two if necessary.

Roast the vegetables at 400 degrees until they begin to sizzle and brown, then stir them with a spatula and continue cooking until tender inside and crisp outside.

While the vegetables are roasting, remove and discard the stems from the beet greens.  Finely chop the greens.

Cut a cabbage in half across it’s equator.  Cut one half into quarters.  Thinly slice one of the quarters along one of the cut edges to make fine shreds.

Toss the cabbage and beet greens with a dressing:  2 T. lime juice, 2 T. mashed avocado, 1 T. olive oil, 1 T. soy sauce plus black pepper.  Allow the slaw to sit for 10 minutes, then toss again and season with additional lime juice or soy sauce if needed.  Add chopped cilantro to taste.

Heat corn tortillas and fill with the roasted vegetables.  Other additions could include feta or cotija cheese, black beans, or avocado.  Top with the slaw.

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