Spaghetti Squash Pho  

This is a vegan recipe that uses spaghetti squash instead of the usual rice noodles to soak up the complex flavors of the traditional Vietnamese spiced broth.

For the broth:  There are several ways to go here.  The easiest route is to purchase vegan Pho broth at the store.

You can also buy vegetarian or mushroom broth or use your own home made broth and then simmer it with the following for at least one hour:  1 large piece of ginger cut into thick slice, 3 whole cloves of garlic, and 2 T. soy sauce.  Toast the following spices toasted in a pan before adding to the broth: 1 cinnamon stick, 6 star anise, 1 cardamon pod, 1 T. fennel seeds, and 1 T. coriander seeds.

For the soup:

Cut one Spaghetti Squash in 3-4 rounds.  Don’t cut it in half lengthwise, as that will make the strands shorter.  Bake at 375 for 30-40 minutes, until the cut edges are nicely browned and the squash is tender.  Allow to cool for 10 minutes, then remove the peel and separate the strands.  Drizzle with a little sesame oil and sprinkle with salt.

Chop 2 spring onions finely, green and white parts.

Shred or julienne 3 carrots.

Soak and drain 3 C. spinach leaves.

Other toppings can include tofu (fried or raw), sliced mushrooms, mint, and/or cilantro.

Put a handful of spaghetti squash into each bowl and then ladle the Pho broth over it.  Serve the Pho with the onions, carrots and spinach and add them  to the bowls of broth while still steaming hot.

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