Shaved Cauliflower Salad with Walnuts

This recipe has a double dose of walnuts:  the nuts themselves and walnut oil, which can be found in most natural food stores.  Alternately you can use olive oil and sesame oil.

Clean and thinly slice 1-2 leeks lengthwise.  Toss with 1 T. olive oil and salt, then roast in a small skillet in the oven at 350 degrees until soft and beginning to brown.

Make the dressing by whisking together 2 T. lemon juice, 1/4 C. walnut oil (or 2 1/2 T. olive oil mixed with 1 t. sesame oil), 3 t. dijon or stoneground mustard, and 1 t. capers.  Season with salt and pepper.

Cut 1 medium head of cauliflower into florets.  Push the florets through the feed tube of a food processor with a slicing disk (or a mandoline), or thinly slice them by hand.

Shave, grate or very thinly slice carrots to make 1 C.

Toss the vegetables with the zest of 1 lemon and 1/4 C. minced parsley.

Toss the cauliflower and carrots with the dressing and allow to sit for an hour, stirring a few times.

Roughly chop 1/2 C. walnuts, then toast in a skillet.

Just before serving, toss the walnuts with the salad and season with more lemon juice, salt and pepper.  If you have any Asian Pears, cut 1 into matchstick slices and toss with the salad as well.

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