Kimchee with Watermelon Radish

Kimchee is a lightly fermented cabbage salad that takes about a week to be ready.  You don’t need any special equipment to make it other than a glass jar with a rubber seal.

Fill a large glass or metal bowl with 12 C. of cold water and add 1/2 Cup of salt to make a brine.

Cut 1 head of cabbage into quarters and remove the thick core, then roughly chop the rest of the cabbage.  Immerse the cabbage in the brine completely, then cover the bowl and let it sit for at least 12 hours and up to 24.

Drain the cabbage and rinse with cold water.

Clean and chop 2-3 spring onions, green and white parts.  Cut 1 watermelon radish and 3 carrots into 2 inch matchsticks.  Finely minced fresh ginger to make 1/4 C.  Mince 1 clove of garlic.

Combine these ingredients in a bowl with 1/4 C. fish sauce and 1/3 C. Korean red pepper powder (optional) or your favorite hot chile powder or paste.  Mix well, then combine with the cabbage leaves and toss well to coat.

Place the kimchi in a large glass jar with a sealing lid and leave in a cool place. After 2-3 days, open the lid to release any gas that has built up and then seal it tightly again.  Shake the jar at least once to mix the liquid.  After 5 days the kimchi will be ready to eat; after 7 days it should be refrigerated.  It will keep for 3 weeks in the fridge but it does get stronger tasting over time.

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