What’s Growing

We farm a number of sites along the north and south banks of Putah Creek totaling about 200 acres. Micro climates and different soil types allow us to produce almost 100 different crops each year, including spring, summer and winter vegetables as well as stone fruit, citrus and nuts (pistachios and walnuts). We have two distinct seasons here: dry and hot from May-October, and cool and wet from November-April. There are very few crops we can’t grow in Winters for at least part of the year, and the majority of the items in our boxes every week come from our own fields and orchards.

What’s Growing at Terra Firma

JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
VEGETABLES
  Asparagus
  Arugula
  Basil
  Beets
  Bok Choy
  Broccoli
  Cabbage
  Carrots
  Cauliflower
  Cooking Greens
  Corn (Sweet)
  Cucumbers
  Garlic
  Green Beans
  Leeks
  Onions
  Peas
  Peppers (Bell)
  Potatoes
  Salad Mix
  Spinach
  Sweet Potatoes
  Tomatoes
  Winter Squash
  Zucchini
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
  FRUIT
  Apricots
  Asian Pears
  Apples
  Cherries
  Figs
  Grapefruit
  Grapes
  Lemons
  Mandarins
  Melons
  Oranges
  Peaches
  Persimmon (Fuyu)
  Plums
  Strawberries
  Tangelos
  Watermelons

CLICK HERE FOR MEMBER NEWS

Many Hands to Grow Your Food

Spring is (one of) the times of year around here when there is always more to do than there is time to get done.  Which might explain why the illustration I made for last week’s newsletter was backwards and upside … Continue reading

Spring is for Lightweights

When you’re shopping for fruits and vegetables, more is less — money per pound, that is.  The highly detailed graph below illustrates how heavier items like potatoes and apples cost less than lighter ones like greens or berries. There are several … Continue reading

The Most Ephemeral Fruit

Thirty years ago — the summer of my sophomore year of college — I was riding a motorcycle across the English countryside to a musical festival with my first-ever girlfriend.  Suddenly an intense fragrance hit our nostrils:  strawberries ripening in the … Continue reading