Garlic-cured Beets and Squash

I recently picked up a mandoline slicer.  It’s like a high-tech cheese grater that allows you cut paper thin slices of many different vegetables, greatly expanding how you can use them in salads and other dishes.
 
Vegetables cured this way are delicious in salads but they also make a tasty and unusual addition to sandwiches.  You can also top with cheese or humus and roll up as you would other cured products.

Cut the leaves off 1 bunch of beets and reserve for cooking.

Trim the ends off 2 summer squash.

Slice garlic or green garlic as thinly as possible to make 1/2 C.  Sprinkle over a cookie sheet in a single layer, then sprinkle with salt and drizzle with olive oil and lemon juice.

Cut 1-2 beets in half and then use a mandoline or the widest blade on your cheese grater to slice them paper thin.

Use a mandoline or vegetable peeler to do the same with the squash, but slice them lengthwise.

Cover half the pan with beets and half with squash, overlapping the slices slightly to fit more.  Drizzle with more lemon juice and olive oil plus salt.  If you have any fresh herbs, chop them and sprinkle over the top as well.

 

Allow the vegetables to cure at room temperature for 2 hours, then remove from the cookie sheet and toss with a salad or refrigerate until used.

 

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