Cauliflower-Tofu Laap

This is a Thai dish — also called “larb” that is traditionally made with ground meat.  Here, minced cauliflower and crumbled tofu provide the same texture.

Use a fork to crumble 12 oz. of firm or extra firm tofu.  Marinate with 1 t. sesame oil and 1 T. soy sauce and let sit for at least 1/2 hour.

Clean and dice 1 large or 2 small spring onions.  Finely mince 1 clove of garlic and fresh ginger to make 2 T.  Toss together with the juice of 1 lemon or 2 limes.  Add 1 T. ground white peppercorns.

Remove the leaves from 1 head of cauliflower and place it stem side down on a cutting board.  Starting on one side, slice down into the cauliflower as thinly as possible.  Repeat until you hit the center core.  Then turn the head 45 degrees and repeat.  Continue until you have done four sides.  Then turn the remaining part of the head on its side and slice until you have cut off all the curds.

Cut all of the slices crosswise as thinly as possible.  What should remain are crumbles.

Mince 2-3 cloves of garlic.

Heat 2 T. safflower or peanut oil in a wok until quite hot, then stir fry the tofu until it begins to brown.  Add the cauliflower and garlic and sprinkle it with 1/2 t. salt. Continue to stir fry until both the cauliflower and the tofu are nicely browned.

Grate carrots to make 1 C. or use a mandolin to make fine threads.  Toss with the tofu/cauliflower combo.

Add the lemon juice mixture, plus 2 T. of fish sauce or soy sauce and more to taste.

Serve the Laap with a large bowl of rinsed and dried whole lettuce leaves.  Spoon the mixture into the lettuce leaves and eat as you would tacos.

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