Cabbage, Leek and Potato Sizzle

Not exactly a casserole or gratin, the Sizzle uses a combination of cooking methods to produce a unique hybrid dish of soft-cooked vegetables and crisp potatoes.
Preheat the oven to 375.

Cut 2 large or 4 medium potatoes into a small dice.  Toss with 1 T. olive oil, 1/4 t. salt, and a sprinkling of rosemary leaves.  Arrange in a single layer on a baking sheet and roast for 35 minutes, rotating them once.

Clean and slice 2 leeks.  Saute in a large oven-proof skillet over low heat in 1 T. butter and 1 T. olive oil plus a pinch of salt.

Trim 2 C. green beans and cut into 1 inch pieces.  When the leeks are completely soft, add them to the pan along with 1 minced clove of garlic, and 1 T. each fresh thyme and rosemary leaves.  Raise the heat.

Cut 1 head of cabbage into quarters, then thinly slice it.  When the beans are tender but still crisp, add the cabbage to the pan and stir well.  Add 1/2 C. or more of water if necessary to keep the mixture saucy.  Cook another minute or two until the cabbage is wilted.

Remove the potatoes from the oven and set aside.  Turn the oven to broil.

Sprinkle the cabbage/bean mixture with 1/2 C grated Parmesan or Romano cheese.  Then cover with a layer of grated mozzarella.

Place the pan several inches below the broiler and broil until the cheese is melted and beginning to brown.

Serve the vegetables topped with the crispy roasted potatoes.

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