Cabbage-Carrot Bean Thread Noodle Stir Fry

Shredded cabbage and carrots are an easy and tasty vegetable combo.  Here they are added to a flavorful noodle dish with a light and spicy sauce.

Soak 8 oz. bean thread noodles in warm water for 20 minutes, then drain and rinse.

Cut a head of cabbage in half across its “equator” and then cut one of the halves in half again.  Shred finely to make 4 Cups.

Grate or julienne carrots to make 2 C.

Soak and drain 4 C. spinach, then chop roughly.  Wash 1 bunch of cilantro and chop to make 1 C.

Mince fresh ginger to make 1 T.  Mince 2 cloves of garlic.

Beat 2 eggs in a bowl and sprinkle with salt and pepper.  In a second bowl, mix 1/2 cup chicken or vegetable stock, 2 tablespoons soy sauce, 2 teaspoons rice vinegar and 1 T. orange juice.  Add 1/4 t. hot chile flakes.

Heat 1 T. vegetable oil in a wok and add half the eggs, spreading it out thinly to coat to make a pancake.  When it is cooked on one side, flip it and cook until done.  Remove to a plate and repeat with the other egg.  Slice the egg pancakes into thin 2 inch long strips.

Add the remaining oil and the ginger and garlic.  Cook for just a few seconds, then add the cabbage and carrots.  Stir fry for 2 minutes, then add the noodles, spinach, and broth.  Turn the heat down and stir fry just until the broth evaporates.  Add the egg and the cilantro and toss to combine.

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