Butternut-Couscous Salad with Chimichurri

Chimichurri is an Argentinean green salsa.  This one uses fresh onions in addition to garlic and so also resembles Chilean “Pebre” sauce.

Pre-heat the oven to 400 degrees.  Peel 1 butternut squash then cut in half lengthwise and remove the seeds and pulp.  Cut into bite-sized cubes.  Toss in a bowl with 1/2 t. salt and 2 T. olive oil, then spread out on a baking sheet.

 

Roast the squash until it is browned on one side, then stir it and brown one other side.  It should be slightly firm on the outside but soft inside.

 

While the squash is cooking, make the sauce.  Finely chop the tops and bottoms of one spring onion.  Mince 2 cloves of garlic.  Toss them with 1/4 C. lemon juice and sprinkle with salt.  Add 1/4 t. crushed red pepper flakesor more to your taste.

 

Wash and dry 1 bunch of cilantro, then chop it and toss with the other ingredients. Add 4 T. olive oil.  (Optional:  add 1 1/2 T. Siracha or other red chile paste).  You can puree the sauce or leave it “chunky”.

 

Place 1 C. dry couscous in a bowl and pouring enough hot water over it to cover.  Put a lid on the bowl to steam.  After 10 minutes, fluff with a fork and cover for another 5 minutes.

 

Toss the squash and couscous together in a large bowl with 1/2 C. crumbled feta cheese, then add the chimichurri sauce and toss to coat.  Serve on a bed of lettuce leaves.

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