Buckwheat Crepes with Asparagus

Adapted from a recipe by David Tanis in the New York Times.
To make the crepes:  whisk together 2 C. buckwheat flour, 1 1/2 C. white flour, 2 eggs, 1 1/2 t. salt and 2 1/2 C. buttermilk.  Refrigerate the batter for 2 hours or overnight.

Thinly slice the bottoms of spring onions to make 2 C.  Finely mince the greens and keep separate.

Thinly slice 1 fennel bulb.

Saute the fennel and onions over medium heat with 2 T. olive oil or butter.  Sprinkle with salt and pepper.  Cook until they are lightly browned, then drizzle with 1 T. lemon juice and turn off the heat.

Heat a crepe pan or 8 inch cast iron skillet.  Coat the pan lightly with butter using a paper towel.  Add 1/4 C. crepe batter and cook until lightly browned on one side — about two minutes — and then quickly flip and cook the other side.  Remove the crepe to a plate.  Stack the other crepes on top as you cook them.

Trim 1 bunch of asparagus, then toss with 1 t. olive oil and salt.  Grill until tender.  (Alternately, you can steam or boil the asparagus until just tender).

Heat the oven to 400 degrees.  Assemble the crepes by spreading a thin layer of the onion/fennel mixture on one half and topping it with 3 asparagus spears.  Sprinkle the whole thing generously with grated Gruyere cheese, then fold over and place in a single layer on a cookie sheet.

Bake for 5-7 minutes and serve sprinkled with the spring onion “chives”.

 

CLICK HERE FOR MEMBER NEWS

Skating Rink or Peach Orchard?

My first lesson about the risks that cold weather poses to fruit trees came from reading John Nichol’s “New Mexico Trilogy”, which included the Milagro Beanfield War. In the fictional valley where the novels are set, the farmers never got … Continue reading

Good Content vs. Good Neighbors

Over the many years I’ve been writing this newsletter, there have been many stories I’ve wanted to tell but couldn’t.  Some of the most “interesting” things that have happened on the farm involved people.  But our farm is a small … Continue reading

Happy Februly!

February is a sleepy month on most farms, even at Terra Firma.  The cold, wet weather of December and January has taken a toll on our winter vegetables, slow down harvest.  And the orchards and other permanent crops are still … Continue reading