Beet-Arborio Rice Pilaf

Beet-Arborio Rice Pilaf

Simpler to make than a risotto, this is delicious on its own or it can be stuffed into acorn squash halves and baked again topped with cheese.

Cut the leaves off 1 bunch of beets.  Scrub the beets.  Remove the stems from the leaves.  Chop the leaves finely.

Peel 2-3 beets and cut into very small cubes.  You want around 1 C. (Alternately you can grate them).

Cut the base and leaves off 1 leek where they meet the stem.  Slice the shank lengthwise in quarters, then run under water to clean.  Then cut the slices crosswise into small pieces.

Heat 2 T. olive oil in a heavy-bottom pot.

Saute the leek in the olive oil until soft.

Add 3/4 C. arborio rice, 2 minced cloves of garlic and 2 t. balsamic vinegar to the pot and cook for 1 minute.

Add the beets, the greens, and 2 C. vegetable broth.  Add a generous amount of salt and pepper.

Bring the pot to a boil, then stir well and cover.  Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until all the liquid has been absorbed.

Chop basil leaves to make 1/2 C. and stir into the pilaf, then cover again and turn off the heat.  Let sit for 3-5 minutes.

Serve the pilaf with grated parmesan cheese and chopped basil leaves.

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