Baked Mashed Potatoes with Garlicky Broccoli

Just in case mashed potatoes isn’t “comfort food” enough for you, this recipe cooks them a second time.  Because of the long baking time, you might want to cook and mash the potatoes one night and bake them the next.  If you’ve got a surplus of potatoes in your fridge, make a double dose of mashed potatoes for dinner one night and save half to make this recipe later in the week.

Boil salted water, then drop in 2 lbs. of scrubbed potatoes.  Cut them so they are roughly equal size.  For extra flavor, add a couple of whole, washed leek leaves to the water and discard when the potatoes are done.

When the potatoes are completely cooked, drain and rinse — saving a cup of the cooking water — then let sit for a few minutes.

Meanwhile, cut the florets off 1 lb. of broccoli and chop into small pieces.   Peel the stem(s) and then dice.

Mince 2-3 cloves of garlic.

Heat 2 T. olive oil in a skillet or wok and saute the garlic and broccoli until the broccoli is bright green and tender.  Season with salt and pepper.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

When the broccoli mixture cools, add 2 beaten eggs and 1/4 C. grated gruyere cheese.

Mash the potatoes with 1/8 C. cream or milk and 2 T. melted butter or olive oil. Combine with the broccoli mixture and place in a lightly oiled 9×12 baking dish or casserole.  Top with grated parmesan cheese.

Bake for 45 minutes.

CLICK HERE FOR MEMBER NEWS

The Grass is always Greener

For the last four years, growing vegetables in the Sacramento Valley has been quite similar to growing them in the deserts of Southern California, the source of the vast majority of the winter produce eaten in the U.S.  There in … Continue reading

The Tale of the Fly and the Squash

Just ten years ago, our winter squash fields were infested every year by a type of stink bug called, appropriately, the Squash Bug.  Squash Bugs love all kinds of winter squash, spearing both plants and fruit with their probosces and … Continue reading

Double Standards and the “Gig” Economy

Farmers who want to provide an incentive for their harvest crews to work faster use a pay system called “piece rate”.  Workers get paid a certain amount for every pound or other unit of strawberries or tomatoes they harvest.  State … Continue reading