Baked Mashed Potatoes with Garlicky Broccoli

Just in case mashed potatoes isn’t “comfort food” enough for you, this recipe cooks them a second time.  Because of the long baking time, you might want to cook and mash the potatoes one night and bake them the next.  If you’ve got a surplus of potatoes in your fridge, make a double dose of mashed potatoes for dinner one night and save half to make this recipe later in the week.

Boil salted water, then drop in 2 lbs. of scrubbed potatoes.  Cut them so they are roughly equal size.  For extra flavor, add a couple of whole, washed leek leaves to the water and discard when the potatoes are done.

When the potatoes are completely cooked, drain and rinse — saving a cup of the cooking water — then let sit for a few minutes.

Meanwhile, cut the florets off 1 lb. of broccoli and chop into small pieces.   Peel the stem(s) and then dice.

Mince 2-3 cloves of garlic.

Heat 2 T. olive oil in a skillet or wok and saute the garlic and broccoli until the broccoli is bright green and tender.  Season with salt and pepper.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

When the broccoli mixture cools, add 2 beaten eggs and 1/4 C. grated gruyere cheese.

Mash the potatoes with 1/8 C. cream or milk and 2 T. melted butter or olive oil. Combine with the broccoli mixture and place in a lightly oiled 9×12 baking dish or casserole.  Top with grated parmesan cheese.

Bake for 45 minutes.


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